A car runs into your utility truck.  Based on the damage, that company truck could be down for weeks.  While the car’s insurance might pay for your repairs, there’s also the lost income while the truck’s down.

Business Interruption Expense or Downtime

Some insurance policies call this lost income ‘Business Interruption Expense’. The innocent party should be compensated for the lost income during the time business was interrupted. If the equipment damaged can be rented, then the rental expense should be reimbursed. In both cases, it’s considered a loss of use claim.

A Different Type of Downtime

Another example of a downtime claim happens on a job site – Imagine if a front-end loader damages the infrastructure you’ve just laid and costs you thousands in repairs and weeks of manpower. Shouldn’t you be compensated for this loss?

These types of losses can play out in many different ways. For instance, multiple companies could be performing work on the same job site. One of these other companies has an employee who isn’t paying attention and drops a steel beam on your underground puller. The damage is substantial and a rental isn’t available. Shouldn’t you be reimbursed for the financial losses this causes?

Negligence: Careless Action Causes Harm

When someone or something causes your business harm, it’s called negligence. While the laws across the United States certainly vary, generally the law protects the damaged party and allows for compensation and reimbursement of all those out of pocket expenses related to the incident, even for large utility companies or contractors.

So, the next time someone damages your equipment or property, consider the idea of pursuing them for the losses they caused.

Eckert & Associates, PA helps businesses collect the money that’s rightfully theirs. We offer complimentary consultations to discuss potential cases. We also offer safety training to businesses via Zoom or in-person for claims and downtime matters.